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Rude? RUDE? Call me rude again, I’ll punch you right in the neck.

I keep meaning to talk about this thing but then other things happen and I want to talk about THEM and I keep forgetting. I know. I’m the worst. How do you even STAND me.

So! Finally! Let’s talk about this totally illustrious thing!

A few weeks ago, some site called The Business Insider that I’ve never heard of, because I don’t care about business, I guess, did this survey where they polled Merkans about what they thought about other states. They asked them questions like “who has the weirdest accent” and such.

NEW YORK WON MANY OF THESE POLLS.

Ready? Want to know what New York is best at?

We have one of the weirdest accents! (Massachusetts won this one.)

We have the best food!

We are one of America’s favorite states! (California won this one.)

We are one of the craziest states! (California ALSO won this one.)

We are one of the drunkest states! (Louisiana won this one.)

We are the most arrogant state!

We are the rudest state!

We are one of the smartest states! (Massachusetts won this one.)

We have the best sports fans!

We apparently also have the WORST sports fans!

We are one of the most overrated states! (California won this one, too.)

So! What does this tell us about my most beloved state?

Yup, there we are! Right there!

Yup, there we are! Right there!

Honestly, I think this tells us more about the people taking the poll than the states, to be frank. The states that consistently got the most votes (people weren’t allowed to vote for their own states) were the biggest, most well-known states. California, New York, Texas, and Florida tended to factor in pretty heavily every time. I think if people didn’t know who to vote for, they were like “eh, I’ll vote for one of the big states that I’m familiar with.”

The weird accent one, I have to assume, is New York City and Long Island. I don’t know if the rest of the state qualifies as “weird.” People from Buffalo have a distinctive way of talking, as do people from upstate, where I’m from. (We have a distinctive Canadian accent. I had to break myself of it when I got to college to stop people from making fun of me.) I’m sure the other bigger cities have a “tell” as well, but I don’t know many people from those places. But I don’t know that people from all of Merka know about our smaller regional dialects. I think they think of New York, they think of either New Yawkas or Lon Guylanders. (I don’t know if they’re “weird,” though. I think they’re wonderful. I adore accents.)

THE BEST FOOD! Do we really? Well, that’s pleasing, right? THANK YOU, PEOPLE WHO WERE POLLED! (I don’t know about the best food. We have excellent food, but I’ve been to a lot of places in other states and have had excellent food…so it’s really subjective, right?)

Aw, we’re one of your favorites. As we SHOULD be. We’re really fantastic. We have Broadway and we have the Adirondack Park and we have Niagara Falls and we have ALBANY. I mean, seriously. We have all the things. (California also has many things. I’m cool with California being a winner here. I very much enjoyed my time in your fine state when I visited, California. Your ocean was lovely. And your people were very friendly.)

We’re apparently both crazy and drunk? This seems suspect. How are we more crazy and drunk than so many other states? By sheer population density? I mean, we didn’t WIN these categories (Dad’s always saying California’s crazy…he calls it “the land of fruits and nuts”…and I guess Louisiana won the drunk competition because of Mardi Gras?) but we were one of the top contenders. I don’t know about crazy. I mean, we HAVE crazies, but what state doesn’t? And as for drunk, again, I don’t know what state doesn’t. These are silly categories.

Well. We’re the most arrogant and most rude state. Again, I have to assume the people taking this poll are judging us on New York City (because let’s face it, people who don’t live here think the state’s one big New York City, sometimes. “Oh, you’re from New York? Did you go to Broadway a lot as a kid?” No. Since it was ALL THE WAY AT THE BOTTOM OF MY STATE, I did not attend a show on Broadway until I was 18, but thank you for assuming I lived on the Great White Way as a toddler.)

Here’s the thing. New Yorkers (I AM talking about the city now) aren’t much more arrogant or rude than any group of people living in a large city. They’re busy, and they’re very often in a hurry, and they don’t like stupidity or things that slow them down or dumb tourists, but they’re actually quite kind. I’ve had New Yorkers be very helpful when I’ve asked for directions; I’ve had people hold doors for me; I’ve seen many genuine smiles and small kindnesses in my trips to my favorite city in the world.

YES. It is things like this that make New Yorkers get rude. STOP BEING BAD TOURISTS WHILE IN THE CITY!!!

YES. It is things like this that make New Yorkers get rude. STOP BEING BAD TOURISTS WHILE IN THE CITY!!!

People seem to ASSUME New York City is rude, and the people arrogant. My mother was PETRIFIED to visit for the first time. She thought she’d get lost and people would laugh at her, possibly while spitting on her, and that she’d get psychomugged like a billion times. (When she got home, she said “Huh. It was nothing like I thought. Mostly just crowded. And the buildings were really tall.”)

This is what made me saddest about this poll. I wish everyone could visit New York City and see the place I do when I visit, and how wonderful it is. I also wish people would stop judging my entire state on New York City. WE ARE A VERY BIG STATE WITH A LOT OF OTHER PLACES IN IT.

See the City? Way down there? And ALL THE REST OF US UP HERE? Sigh.

See the City? Way down there? And ALL THE REST OF US UP HERE? Sigh.

Back to the poll. We are one of the smartest states! I assume Massachusetts won this because of all their colleges. That’s ok. We ARE very intelligent. She says humbly. The people I know here are very bright. I have such intelligent conversations with people. They genuinely love to learn. This makes me so happy. So YES. This one’s valid. We’re smarties, we are.

I don’t know anything about this best/worst sports fan thing. It seems like a stupid question to ask and answer and what makes a good/bad sports fan, really? Silly silly silly.

We are one of the most overrated states? Huh. I’d say there’s no WAY we are rated highly ENOUGH, yo. Because we are the BEST. THE! BEST! Fine, I might be a little biased, here. But I’m also RIGHT. (Why you hatin’ on my state, yo? I don’t say mean things about YOUR state!)

What have we learned today, bloggonians?

  • New York is apparently one of the states people think of when there are polls about things.
  • People seem to think we’re rude and arrogant but also have delicious noms and are super-smart so SUCK IT!
  • Polls are silly. And oddy biased. And sometimes ask weird questions that make no sense.
  • NEW YORK IS THE BEST STATE EVERRRRRRR. (What? We didn’t learn that? Fine, I’m cheating. But it’s with LOVE. I’m cheating with LOVE.)

Happy Monday, internet. I hope you had weekends of adventure and your weeks ahead are the best of the best. Here in Amy-land it is COUNTDOWN TO LAURA WEEK. Laura will be here on FRIDAY! I cleaned the house so she doesn’t arrive to a messy cat-fur wonderland! IT IS ALL VERY EXCITING!

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About lucysfootball

I'm not the girl with the most cake. Someday. SOMEDAY. View all posts by lucysfootball

22 responses to “Rude? RUDE? Call me rude again, I’ll punch you right in the neck.

  • Andreas Heinakroon

    Well, punching people in the neck is pretty rude.

    Like

  • Andreas Heinakroon

    I’m no expert or anything, having been in NYC only once, but I didn’t find people rude. Busy, yes. And stressed sometimes, but it’s a big city after all. What do people expect? Friendly villagers?

    (Actually, compared to Stockholm, Sweden, people in NYC were both helpful and friendly. I really want to go back one day…)

    Like

    • lucysfootball

      SERIOUSLY! (“Friendly villagers” made me giggle.)

      They’re very busy, and always seem to be in a rush, but I’ve never really had anyone be super-rude to me that I remember.

      Remember how nice that man was when we were at the Baby Gap? And LUSH? Aw, come back soon, Andreas, I want to have more New York City adventures with you!

      Like

  • Andreas Heinakroon

    You don’t have a Canadian accent, do you? You don’t say ‘aboot’ or anything.

    Like

    • lucysfootball

      No, but I *did* used to say “so-rry” instead of “saw-rry” and it drove one of my college friends INSANE. To the point that I changed it so he would stop mocking me about it. Everyone up there says it like that. (I do still call knit ski caps “toques,” though, instead of “beanies” like most people do.)

      Like

  • Charleen

    One of my best friends lives in NYC, and another friend of ours linked an article recently that gives some perspective on the whole “rudeness” thing:

    http://huff.to/1dJrFO4

    Now, I do have to say that if you choose to live in NYC, then you are also choosing to deal with tourists. Not to say that SOME tourists aren’t deserving of a little extra rudeness for being morons, but it isn’t really fair to get mad about all these extra people “disrupting” your day. So… I don’t know that I agree with the article as a whole or not. But it definitely brings up some good points to consider.

    All that said, the one time I was in NYC, I didn’t find the people to be rude… but a) I am not a moron who pauses in the middle of walkways or doorways, oblivious to the masses of people around me, and b) I LOVE when my interactions with strangers are kept to the bare minimum. I think maybe a lot of the people who find New Yorkers to be rude come from a place where they’re used to people being all smiles and small-talk. Me, I love the efficiency. A smile is certainly nice, but not required, and PLEASE no small talk, I just want to buy my ticket or my meal or my ridiculous souvenir purchase and get on with my day.

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    • lucysfootball

      I read that as well, and I agree with it. I’m sure it’s tough as a New Yorker to deal with the constant stream of tourists, especially when they’re rude.

      And I’m with you on the efficiency – it’s one of the things that I love about New York City. I love the pace and I love the rush. I’m sure I was one of the annoying slow people the first few times, but now I’m with the flow, and it makes me so happy to be part of that every time I go. It makes me feel like I’m part of a huge well-oiled machine.

      Like

  • Jupiter

    Thank you , all the way from smack dab in the middle of NY. STATE,that is.

    Like

  • DogsDontPurr

    I live in Los Angeles, which gets stereotyped beyond belief….just like people think New York is all New York *City.* It’s funny how many people have misconceptions about these places. When people think “Hollywood,” they’re more likely imaging Beverly Hills. And when they think “Beverly Hills” they’re more likely imaging Malibu. Heck, even people who actually live here have a very skewed view of what Los Angeles is all about. And what really cracks me up, is that the show “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” is actually shot in the hills around Malibu and Calabasas….nowhere near Beverly Hills. Crazy!

    Like you said, these polls are more telling of the people who take them. And quite likely, those people have never even been to the places they voted on.

    Like

    • lucysfootball

      I guess we are all our biggest cities, sadly. I mean, New York City is awesome, but so are a lot of other cities here. And the countryside. And a lot of the places in between.

      I’m betting you’re right – they’ve only heard stories and rumors about these cities and they’re voting based on hearsay. Sad, really.

      Like

  • Heather

    There is definitely some truth to the “rude” aspect of NY, but I’m sure it’s not limited to NY.

    When I moved to PA, I couldn’t believe how much nicer PA drivers seemed to be. It was seriously a huge difference. Now that I’ve been here for over ten years, the drivers don’t seem so nice anymore, but whenever I go back to NY, the difference is very noticeable.

    Also, people in the south tend to be SO NICE. I drove from PA to FL one summer, and the level of niceness in random people got considerable higher the farther south I went.

    HOWEVER, I was probably just hitting all the right places. I’m sure that the “rudeness” of NY is one of those things that started out small and ended up growing into this huge assumption/stereotype. Because there is a mix of rude and nice people everywhere.

    Like

    • lucysfootball

      The drivers here are…abrupt. I’ll give you that. (But good! I got in two accidents in the southwest that’d NEVER have happened here!)

      And yes, southerners seem nice, but as a New Yorker, I distrust nice. I feel they’re mocking me. ARE YOU MOCKING ME, SOUTHERNERS? No one’s that nice, right?

      Like

      • cynthiaw

        Yes, many Southerners are mocking you! No, not really, but most of us are polite whether we feel like it or not. I’m originally from the Midwest and people are pretty darn polite there, too – but it’s an art form here. An ANNOYING one if you weren’t prepared to have a big ole conversation with your grocery checker about exactly what you plan to do with your alfalfa sprouts or tofu or whatever hippie food you happen to be buying. I always feel like saying “ummm… eat it?” But I usually explain anyway.

        People have all SORTS of opinions about Texas, too, most of which are false, but perpetuated by a bunch of obnoxious stereotypical Texans. We are not all Rick Perry – just like everyone in New Jersey doesn’t act like the rejects on Jersey Shore.

        I mean, sure, we have Rick Perry and George W and (ugh) Ted Cruz, but we also have (had) Ann Richards and Molly Ivins and Kinky Friedman and ZZ Top and Willie Nelson and BEYONCE – seriously, we’re not all a bunch of gun-toting, Tea Party-having, Dallas Cowboy-loving lunatics. Well, I have guns, but I don’t really tote them anywhere. They mostly sit in the safe unless the hubs is out-of-town or we’re going to the range. Sigh. And the Cowboys can suck it.

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        • lucysfootball

          I know a lot of people who have those stereotypes about Texas…to which I reply, “Listen, some of my most favorite people are from Texas, so shush it.”

          It’s a state. With people. Who are all different. There may be some people who feel the same about things; those people may or may not be the majority (just like here.) But I hate blanket generalizations. They’re lazy, and they make me exhausted.

          (I would never fit in in the South. I like my interactions nonexistent or, if necessary, as brief as possible. “$10.07. Thank you. Have a nice day. You too!” DONE.)

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          • cynthiaw

            It’s not as bad here, because I live in a big city. When I first moved to South Carolina, it drove me CRAZY.

            Clerk: “What are you going to do with that?” (veal)
            Me: “Make veal parmigiana”
            C: “Ooh, that sounds good. How do you make that?”
            Me: (seething) Starts to recite recipe. Has to wait for clerk to find a pen and piece of paper. Marvels at how no one behind me is getting irritated.

            And people walk so sloooooooooooooooooooooow… and have no concept of how much space they are taking up in aisles. I like to be fast and efficient when at the store.

            Like

  • Jonathan Caswell

    I grew up in New York State (Binghamton), went to school there (SUC. CORTLAND), and get out about once a year to visit my wife’s people up near and in Johnsburg in the Adirondacks. A lot of people migrated from New England to settle New York. Good State. Great people…including you :) !

    Like

  • Jonathan Caswell

    Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    I REMEMBER THE “GREENIE” PUNCHES, WAITING FOR ENTRANCE INTO JUNIOR HIGH…BUT THAT WAS BINGHAMTON.

    Like

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